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APPENDIX 10. EXTENDED ENGLISH - THAI VOCABULARY

The Extended Vocabulary which follows contains all the words you have had in the various sectional vocabularies as well as a large number of others which are in fairly common use; about 2600 altogether.

Be a little careful about picking new words out of the vocabulary and using them. If they are nouns you can’t go far wrong as in most cases any one noun can be substituted for another but adjectives, adverbs, prepositions and verbs are very often used in certain contexts only and if you use them wrongly you will not be understood.

For instance; POP (พบ) means “to meet” but “to meet someone at the airport” is RUP (รับ) “to receive”.

Again “for rent” is HYCHOW (ให้เช่า) and you cannot use SUMRUPCHOW.

You are more likely to be understood if you get the construction right even if some of the tones are wrong than if all your tones are faultless but you use the wrong words and get the rhythm of the sentence wrong. If you want to try new words, and you should, check up with your teacher or a Thai friend first if possible.

Where a word has been dealt with specifically in a particular lesson the number and a link to the lesson is provided and this to some extent serves as an index to the words of special usage. In most cases an example showing the usage will be found in the lesson referred to or the following one.

In order to save space many of the more obvious compound words have been omitted as you should now be able to make these up yourself.


e.g.
TOOK “every” TOOK KON “everyone” TOOK WUN “everyday” etc.

Thai words and syllables in brackets are those which are often omitted in conversation.


e.g.
LORT FY (FAR) “electric light bulb”. Usually called LORT FY.

No significance attaches to the fact that the English approximation of the Thai spelling is sometimes written as two or more words; this is merely done for clarity and to help in separation of the syllables.

The tones of all words are shown by the small letters after the English approximation using the following convention.


c Common tone.
r Rising tone.
l Low tone.

d Dropped tone.
h High tone.

A Thai-English vocabulary is provided but is very inadequate and if you are going to do any reading outside this book you will have to get a Thai-English dictionary anyhow.

Of the Thai-English dictionaries available, McFarland, though a little out of date and rather expensive, is well arranged and contains a vast amount of information not found elsewhere. It is a “must” for any serious student. “The Student’s Thai-English Dictionary” by Mary Haas of the University of California published in 1964 is a most welcome addition to Thai lexicography, and gives the pronunciation of every word in phonetic symbols. It also gives a great number of examples of common idiomatic usage.

The Modern Standard Dictionary by Plang Phloyphrom is well produced, cheap and very comprehensive Thai-English dictionary.

Of the English-Thai dictionaries, the “New Model English-Thai Dictionary” by So Sethaputra is by far the best although it is compiled for Thai rather than for students of Thai. It is therefore of real value only to advanced students who can select the particular word they want from the large number of alternatives given against each English word.

A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z


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